Pet Dental Care

Dental care for your pets is just as important as taking them in for regular checkups and getting their vaccinations. The health of your pet’s teeth plays a major role in their quality and length of life. 

By the age of just 3 years old, over 80% of dogs and cats will develop some level of periodontal disease. 

When rough tartar accumulates on the surface of the teeth and touches the gum line, it is time for a professional dental cleaning exam with your veterinarian, and an in-depth discussion about ongoing treatment and prevention for your specific pet’s needs.

Oral Health in Dogs and Cats 

If your pet has any of the following, it may be time to see the vet: 

  • Bad breath
  • Broken or loose teeth 
  • Extra teeth
  • Retained baby teeth 
  • Tartar buildup on teeth 
  • Discoloration
  • Bleeding from the mouth
  • Visible mouth/tooth pain 
  • Swelling in the areas surrounding the mouth 

Your pet’s teeth should be examined at least once every six months by your veterinarian to check for early signs of problems like disease-causing bacteria, and to keep your pet’s mouth healthy. 

Causes of Pet Dental Issues

Pets develop a lot of the same dental problems as humans including: 

  • Broken teeth and roots
  • Periodontal disease
  • Infected teeth 
  • Abscesses
  • Misalignment of the teeth and bite 
  • Broken/fractured jaw
  • Cleft palate or other palate defects 

What Happens During A Professional Dental Cleaning With the Veterinarian? 

An initial dental cleaning consultation exam allows us to first of all confirm that a dental cleaning is needed, and additionally make sure your pet is healthy enough to undergo the dental procedure. 

This includes things like physically examining your pet for any issues, running preanesthetic blood tests to ensure kidney and liver function are satisfactory for anesthesia, as well as examining the heart and abdomen if needed. Any required procedures that may be needed before the exam will also be discussed.

During the dental cleaning visit, your pet’s teeth will be thoroughly examined, cleaned and polished to remove the tartar and periodontal disease-causing plaque. This is done with the help of veterinary assistants while your pet is under anesthesia, at which time any abnormalities will also be noted in the medical record. 

A dental probe will be used to evaluate gum bleeding and periodontal pockets where food can accumulate and decay if not properly cared for. 

When periodontal disease is advanced, it isn’t always possible to save the badly affected teeth, at which point extraction may need to happen either during the procedure or at a later time. 

The specific treatment that your dog will require will be discussed with you after the cleaning and the tooth-by-tooth inspection under anesthesia. It can be difficult to predict the extent of dental disease in advance, so your veterinarian may call you during the procedure to discuss any findings or additional treatment that may be necessary.

Why Does Dentistry Require Anesthesia? 

Anesthesia is important so that the vet can examine your pet, tooth-by-tooth including dental x-rays. Anesthesia allows your pet to rest pain-free throughout the cleaning, even when painful procedures, such as tooth extractions, are necessary. Without anesthesia, your pet will be fully aware of every poke and prod performed by a stranger. Many pets are uncomfortable when strangers handle their head, and more so if they are forcibly restrained, with their mouth held open for an unpleasant procedure. Eliminate your pet’s stress completely through general anesthesia, and return home with a happy pet with a thoroughly clean mouth. 

What Can I Do at Home for My Pet’s Oral Health? 

Caring for our pet’s teeth is not unlike caring for human teeth. Starting with a clean slate is the best way to begin oral care, so the first step is always a comprehensive oral health assessment and treatment that includes a dental cleaning, dental radiographs, and oral examination and cleaning/treatment under anesthesia. 

At your dental cleaning appointment with the Veterinarian, the doctor can discuss recommended pet oral health products and techniques such as: 

  • Daily brushing with pet-safe toothpaste 
  • Oral rinses and water additives 
  • Dental wipes
  • Dental diets and chews 
  • … and more

(Ask about our dental health product line for pets!) 

Take advantage of our $199 Dental Cleaning Special today! ($399 value) 

Click here to book your FREE Dental Cleaning Consultation Exam. An initial dental cleaning consultation exam allows us to first of all confirm that a dental cleaning is needed, and additionally make sure your pet is healthy enough to undergo the dental procedure. 

This includes things like physically examining your pet for any issues, running preanesthetic blood tests to ensure kidney and liver function are satisfactory for anesthesia, as well as examining the heart and abdomen if needed. 

Any required procedures that may be needed before the exam will also be discussed.

During the dental cleaning visit, your pet’s teeth will be thoroughly examined, cleaned and polished to remove the tartar and periodontal disease-causing plaque.

When periodontal disease is advanced, it isn’t always possible to save the badly affected teeth, at which point extraction may need to happen either during the procedure or at a later time. 

The specific treatment that your dog will require will be discussed with you after the cleaning and the tooth-by-tooth inspection under anesthesia. 

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